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#TBT

November 14, 2013 — by WEBOOST

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Happy Thursday!

We’re at it again 🙂 Can you guess what this is?!? Let us know in the comments section below, (or on Facebook/Twitter), WHAT you think this is, and what YEAR you think it is from. We will pick a random winner from the responses to get a free Sleek 4G cell phone signal booster!

Have fun guessing, and remember to check back tomorrow to see if you won!

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    Comments (10)

    Amanda on November 14, 2013 at 5:49 pm said:

    1844 telegraph register invented by Alfred Vail

    David Steele on November 14, 2013 at 5:51 pm said:

    My guess is it is an electronic telegraph transmitter created early 1800s…say 1804-1809

    Arrahwanna McMasters on November 14, 2013 at 7:27 pm said:

    Telegraph key…1800-1890

    Enrique A. Callejas on November 15, 2013 at 5:21 am said:

    Morse code tapper 1837

    Enrique A. Callejas on November 15, 2013 at 5:22 am said:

    How do I claim my prize?

    Harri Maki on November 15, 2013 at 6:58 am said:

    Morse code signaller.

    Erin Simmons on November 15, 2013 at 3:30 pm said:

    Early 1800’s telegraph key used by the government & railroad.. Very cool ! Really could use that signal booster! We have 0 signal.. happy thanks giving all, & merry Christmas too! God bless! ♡

    Ron Dill on November 15, 2013 at 5:50 pm said:

    resembles Speed X or Signal Electric Co. morse code/telegraph key. circa…1850-1950’s.

    Ron Dill on November 15, 2013 at 5:53 pm said:

    Could also be a Vail Lever Correspondent telegraph key. Used around 1844 i think.

    Ian Hessey on November 15, 2013 at 5:59 pm said:

    Morse code key, This was used on phone lines from mid 1800s and over SW and HF bands and still is used today by some keen radio hams.
    But now morse can be sent and receved over RF using computer programs. You can tune your home AM radios to hear and decode morse.